Health 2006

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

MORE NEW YORKERS TAKING STEPS TO LIVE LONGER AND HEALTHIER LIVES


DOHMH Releases Two-Year Report on the Progress of Take Care New York Health Policy
NEW YORK CITY - June 19, 2006 - More New Yorkers are taking steps to live longer and healthier lives, including having a regular doctor, getting life saving colonoscopies, and quitting smoking, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) announced today. Marking the second anniversary of the City’s ambitious Take Care New York (TCNY) health policy, DOHMH issued its annual progress report on the health of the City.
Launched in 2004, Take Care New York outlines 10 key steps all New Yorkers can take to be healthier, focusing on the health issues that cause hundreds of thousands of preventable illnesses and deaths in New York City each year. DOHMH aims to drastically improve health in these areas by 2008.
Since 2002, significant progress has been made:
• 290,000 more New Yorkers have a regular doctor. The number of New Yorkers with a regular health care provider rose significantly between 2002 and 2005, from 4,470,000 to 4,760,000 (75% of the way to the 2008 goal of 4,850,000).
• 13% overall decline in adult smoking rates. The percentage of adult New Yorkers who smoke decreased from 21.6% in 2002 to 18.9% in 2005 (more than 60% of the way to the 2008 goal of 18%). While there has been a large decrease in smokers since 2002, smoking rates among New York City adults leveled off between 2004 and 2005.
• 300 fewer deaths from HIV. The number of New Yorkers who died from HIV/AIDS-related illness decreased from 1,712 in 2002 to 1,412 in 2005 (more than 40% of the way to the 2008 goal of fewer 1,000 HIV deaths).
• 176 fewer deaths from alcohol and drugs. The number of New Yorkers who died from alcohol-attributable causes decreased from 1,551 in 2002 to 1,444 in 2004 (more than 70% of the way to the 2008 goal of 1,400 deaths). Deaths from drug-related causes declined from 905 in 2002 to 836 in 2005 (28% of the way to the 2008 goal of 655).
• 30% increase in colonoscopy screening rates. The percentage of New Yorkers over age 50 who received a colonoscopy screening for colon cancer within the last 10 years increased from 42% in 2003 to 55% in 2005, (65% of the way to the 2008 goal of 60% of New Yorkers age 50 and over).
• Fewer young children newly identified with lead poisoning. Nearly 150 fewer children under age 6 were newly identified with lead poisoning and a lead-based paint violation in 2005 than in 2002 (more than 30% of the way to the 2008 goal of fewer than 260 children).

The report is comprised of data from DOHMH’s 2005 Community Health Survey and preliminary vital statistics data from 2005. For more information on Take Care New York, to order literature, or to become a TCNY partner organization, visit www.takecarenewyork.org or call 311.

2 Comments:

  • At 5:36 AM, Blogger Kate said…

    Hi, just repaying the visit you made to my blog.

    Wow, what a mine of information you have here, it's great resource, very informative. I agree with your post about ways parents can help their children to lose weight, it's very good advice!

     
  • At 10:32 PM, Blogger hetera (UK) said…

    "More New Yorkers are taking steps to live longer and healthier lives, including having a regular doctor, getting life saving colonoscopies, and quitting smoking"
    I am really very happy for that!At last people started thinking about their health:)

     

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